Posts Tagged "Largo podiatrists"

Shockwave Therapy for Heel Pain Relief

Posted by on Jun 28, 2016 in Heel Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, Shockwave Therapy |

When you’re having heel pain, you’ll try anything to get rid of the pain. One technique that is rapidly gaining popularity today is shockwave therapy for heel pain. This therapy works on the proven theory that creating micro-trauma on a cellular level causes the blood vessels and bone cells within your body to regenerate so that they heal faster. As such, it is a safe, non-invasive way to treat many chronic conditions. What some people find funny is the paradox here that when you damage your foot, you actually heal it. The technique used here involves a series of movements that place tension on the area of your heel that’s causing the pain. Your technician then uses a shockwave hand piece transmitting shock waves to this area for four or five minutes. These shocks feel like a small baseball bat that’s hitting your heel’s tissue causing the microbleeding and bruising that aren’t too painful and thus don’t require any anti-inflammatory drugs or icing. The bruising is actually a necessary part of the repair process that takes place over the next few months. So, while the process is uncomfortable, it isn’t painful. Even the minimal amount of discomfort you feel diminishes as the treatment goes on. Therefore, there’s no reason you wouldn’t want to undergo the treatment again in the future. In fact, considering that you’ll experience between a 70% and 90% reduction in your pain, you’ll want to have at least three or four more treatments so that you can walk on your heels once...

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Hammertoe Causes & Treatment Options

Posted by on Dec 9, 2015 in Hammertoes |

There are many foot problems that people are afflicted with but one very painful condition is hammertoes. A hammertoe occurs when the middle of the toe points upward strangely. Hammertoes usually in the second toe will develop a callus on the top of the first joint of the toe which is painful. Causes of Hammertoes Hammertoes can be a heredity trait passed down to you from your parents. The second toe can be abnormally long with the tip constantly being pressed into a bent position. Sometimes a tight tendon does not allow the toe to lay flat and a hammertoe will develop. A bunion on the big toe can press the second toe into a bent position. Muscle weakness or arthritis may make the toes to constrict into a hammer position. Shoes that do not fit properly can lead to hammertoes plus other foot problems. Shoes can cause the toe to bend at the joint and put weight on the tip. In time the tendon constricts and the toe tightens into this unusual position. These are some of the causes of hammertoes that when left untreated become very painful. A Largo podiatrist can sometimes prevent hammertoes from becoming inflexible, deformed and painful. When the tendon is still pliable using lamb’s wool padding or special splints to hold the toe in its normal, aligned position will help the hammertoe. Wearing wider shoes will keep the toes from crowding again. When a hammertoe is left untreated the cartilage between the joints wears out and the toe loses its pliability and function. Hammertoes can cause an unusual manner of walking which can cause back, hip and knee problems. If you notice a toe looking abnormal and the joint is bent it is time to seek help from a foot doctor. If a hammertoe is very painful and your shoes no longer fit, surgery may be the only option. At the deformed joint, 1/16th to 1/18th inch of bone is extracted which allows the linked toe bones to lay flat. In the past it took 60 days of healing from hammertoe surgery, but today many Largo podiatric surgeons are trained to perform minimal incision surgery. This surgery can be done in the doctor’s office, and the likelihood of infection is lowered and pain can be managed with aspirin. With minimal incision hammertoe surgery you can walk right away and return to work in a few days providing your work allows sitting most of the time. If you wear roomy, practical shoes hammertoes rarely return. So if you notice your toes looking abnormal and they are painful it’s time to visit a podiatrist. Hammertoes left untreated eventually make it very painful to walk or stand on your feet. With proper treatment it is possible to correct a hammertoe and relieve the discomfort caused by the bent joint. If you are looking for a podiatrist in the Largo, FL area visit our website for information about our doctors and the services we...

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Toenail Disorders May Be More Serious Than Many People Realize

Posted by on Nov 18, 2015 in Toenail Fungus |

When Americans think of toenail disorders, cancer is typically the last thing that comes to their minds. However, it is not uncommon for cancer to show up on the feet and underneath of a person’s toenails. Unfortunately, many people often mistake the signs of toenail bed cancer as blood blisters from impact injuries or other toenail disorders. Toenail disorders that tend to mimic the outward signs of subungual melanomas include, but are not confined to the following: Longitudinal Linear Lesions Splinter Hemorrhages Melanonychia Striata Fungal Infections They typically involve a black or brown discoloration that forms underneath of the toenail. Cancer presents itself the same way with a few key, and often subtle, differences. It too will show up underneath the toenail as a discolored spot or line. The spot or line will usually have an irregular border, asymmetrical shape and variations in shading or coloration. As time goes on, the spot or line may change shape, spread throughout the nail bed and possibly to the surrounding soft tissue. If it spreads too much, surgical amputation will most likely be ordered, as well as chemotherapy and skin grafting. Therefore, Largo podiatrists typically order biopsies to determine whether or not a patient has cancer, or one of the other toenail disorders mentioned earlier. The biopsy generally involves removing the toenail so a proper tissue sample may be obtained. If the discolored area is rather large, the podiatrist or attending physician may need to repair the hole made by the tissue sampling process with sutures and order post-opt wound care. The length of healing time involved will vary based on how well the patient follows the podiatrist’s wound care recommendations, the wound’s initial size, and the patient’s overall health. After the biopsy procedure is complete, the tissue sample is usually tested in-house or at a local lab. If cancerous cells are detected, additional treatment, as mentioned above, may be needed. To speak with a podiatrist about this and other serious toenail disorders, please call our office...

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Managing Pain in the Arch Of The Foot

Posted by on Oct 28, 2015 in Foot Arch Pain, General Foot Care |

There are a myriad of conditions that can affect the health of your foot. Ill-fitting shoes, blisters, corns, calluses, and tough footwear are just a number of the reasons why you might be suffering from pain in the arch of foot. Learn how you can manage the pain at home – however, if the problem persists, it is recommended that you contact a podiatrist to find an underlying problem. Whеn уоur feet hurt, yоu hurt. Relieve thе pain wіth а foot massage. Stroke уour foot wіth уour thumb frоm thе base оf уоur heel to уоur toes.Try аsking someоne а foot massage, if уоu саn’t manage gіvіng уoursеlf оne. Focusing оn thе soles саn actuallу relax аn individual. Start stroking the soles оf thе foot going in straight lines. Fоllоwіng thе soles hаvе bееn properly massaged, уоu саn proceed tо the top аnd middle аnd аlsо thе toes оf thе foot. Use a gentle motion to massage your toes, stretching them until the soreness goes away. Usе уour thumbs to put pressure іn the sole оf уour foot, slowly going frоm thе toes tо thе heel. You саn employ mоrе pressure by kneading the sole with your knuckles, fоr feet whісh аrе еsрecially achy. Finally, treat уour weary feet wіth а rich moisturizer. Over the counter medicines can also help for short term pain management. Ibuprofen is known to be help dull the pain. Contact us to learn how you can manage pain in the arch of the foot, or if nothing that you do at home is particularly...

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5 Tips for Preventing Foot and Ankle Injuries/Fractures

Posted by on Jun 12, 2015 in Foot Fractures, General Foot Care, Running Injuries |

Foot and ankle injuries, particularly stress fractures, are an unfortunately all-too-common side effect in many runners, athletes, and sports enthusiasts alike. Soccer and tennis players, as well as track and field participants are among the many people who need to adhere to strict training routines in order to avoid any lengthy and nagging problems from occurring. What follows are five simple tips and precautions we can all take if we enjoy any of these activities, to avoid foot fractures and other foot and ankle problems: Two Minute Warming – Warm up your muscles by stretching or jogging slowly for at least two to three minutes before any sports related activity. Be careful not to perform any bouncing motions when stretching, whereas this can actually cause injury. If you Build Them, They Will Come – Gradually build your muscles by properly conditioning them. This conditioning can be done by slowly increasing your workout or activity over the period of several weeks at the time. If the Shoe Fits, Wear It – Always take the time and effort to research and buy properly fitting, supportive, and comfortable shoes. It can also help to buy the appropriate shoe for the corresponding activity, e.g., tennis shoes for tennis, golf shoes for golf, etc. Cross-trainers are a great all-purpose solution, but specialized shoes are usually best. Replacing shoes regularly is a good idea as well. Active runners and other athletes should replace shoes every six months at least, maybe even more often. Watch Your Step – If you’re a trail runner, be wary of stumps, rocks, and other uneven ground. These are big problems and typical causes of foot fractures and ankle injuries among runners. Also, pick a soft surface like dirt when possible for running. Otherwise asphalt is actually a bit softer than concrete. The softer the surface you run on, the less shock impact that your lower legs will have to absorb. Pay Attention – If you start experiencing pain during your athletic activity, temporarily stop the activity while you recover. When you feel an appropriate amount of time for healing has elapsed, begin your activity again slowly and pay attention to what your body is telling you regarding any sort of potential injury, in the form of recurring pain or discomfort. These are just a few precautions that can be taken to continue to do some of the healthy things that you love best as an active individual. Perhaps the Cardinal Rule, however, is to use common sense. Do pay particular attention to what your body is telling you. This will avoid any extended periods of forced inactivity due to long-lasting and bothersome foot or ankle injuries. And remember…if you suffer a foot or ankle injury call your Largo podiatrists to schedule an office...

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